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1

Monday, August 21st 2006, 5:43pm

German Small Arms

A listing of standard issue German small arms, for the Heere, the Kriegsmarine, and the Luftwaffe.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Hrolf Hakonson" (Nov 3rd 2007, 12:38pm)


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Monday, August 21st 2006, 5:46pm

[SIZE=4]Standard small arms calibers are:[/SIZE]

The Heere - 1931

9 x 19mm (pistols and SMGs)
7.92 x 57mm (rifles and machineguns)
7 x 40mm (rifles, new caliber beginning to supplant 7.92x57)
13 x 94mm (ATRs)

1933
7.92/15 x 96mm (ATRs)


The Kriegsmarine - 1931

Standard small arms calibers are:
9 x 19mm (pistols)
7.92 x 57mm (rifles and machineguns)

1935
7.92/15 x 96mm (ATRs)


The Luftwaffe - 1935

Standard small arms calibers are:
9 x 19mm (pistols and SMGs)
9 x 17mm (aircrew pistols) (adopted 1936)
7 x 40mm (rifles)
7.92 x 57mm (machineguns)
7.92/15 x 96mm (ATRs)

This post has been edited 5 times, last edit by "Hrolf Hakonson" (Dec 9th 2008, 4:58pm)


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Thursday, August 24th 2006, 3:13pm

Small arms of the Heere

Rifles:
7.92 x 57mm Mauser Kar. 98a (reserve, 1936)
7 x 40mm Mauser Kar. 31
7 x 40mm Solothurn Kar. 37 (1937)

Pistols
9 x 19mm Luger P.08
9 x 19mm FN P.36

Machineguns
7.92 x 57mm MG 08
7.92 x 57mm MG 15 (obsolete, 1935)
7.92 x 57mm MG 30 (reserve, 1936)
7.92 x 57mm MG 33

Submachineguns
9 x 19mm Bergmann 1918
9 x 19mm Erma MP36

Anti-tank rifles
13 x 94mm PanzerBuchse 18 (reserve, 1936)
7.92/15 x 96mm PanzerBuchse 32
7.92/15 x 96mm PanzerBuchse 34


Small arms of the Kriegsmarine

Rifles:
7.92 x 57mm Mauser Kar. 98a

Pistols
9 x 19mm Luger P.08

Machineguns
7.92 x 57mm MG 08
7.92 x 57mm MG 30

Submachineguns
9 x 19mm Bergmann 1918

Anti-tank rifles
7.92/15 x 96mm PanzerBuchse 32


Small arms of the Luftwaffe

Rifles:
7 x 40mm Mauser Kar. 31
7 x 40mm Solothurn Kar. 37

Pistols
9 x 19mm Luger P.08
9 x 17mm Walther PPK (aircrew)

Machineguns
7.92 x 57mm MG 33

Submachineguns
9 x 19mm Bergmann 1918
9 x 19mm Erma MP36

Anti-tank rifles
7.92/15 x 96mm PanzerBuchse 34

This post has been edited 9 times, last edit by "Hrolf Hakonson" (Feb 10th 2009, 5:03am)


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Wednesday, August 26th 2009, 5:45pm

Small Arms Cartridges

Pistol & SMG cartridges

9x19mm - 7.5 gram projectile at 320 - 390 m/s (depending on length of barrel, higher in SMGs than in pistols)
9x17mm - 6.2 gram projectile at 300 m/s


Rifle cartridges
7x40mm - 8 gram projectile at 780m/s
7.92x57mm - 12.8 gram projectile at 760 m/s


Machinegun cartridges
7.92x57mm - 12.8 gram projectile at 760 m/s

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Saturday, December 4th 2010, 6:55pm

Maschinenpistole 36

(Machine Pistol Model 36)

The Machine Pistol Model 36 was designed by Berthold Geipel of the Erfurter Maschinen und Werkzeugfabrik firm in 1935 in response to a joint Heer and Luftwaffe requirement for a light automatic weapon suitable for use by parachutists and vehicle crews of the expanding Panzertruppen. It drew upon earlier work of Heinrich Vollmer but was constructed primarily of stamped steel rather than machined parts, and employed electro-spot welding as much as possible. A handguard, made of a synthetic material derived from bakelite, is located between the magazine housing and the pistol grip. German soldiers are trained to grasp the handhold on the underside of the weapon to avoid burns from an overheated barrel.

While widely issued to Luftwaffe paratroopers, in the Heer issue is restricted to platoon and squad leaders, or to vehicle crews as a defence weapon should they be forced to abandon their vehicles. Proposals have been brought forward to expand the issue of the MP36 more widely throughout the Heer, though these have been resisted up to the present time. The weapon is currently in production and is available for export to friendly countries.

Three firms are presently engaged in executing Heer and Luftwaffe orders for the MP36:

Erfurter Maschinen und Werkzeugfabrik GmbH, Erfurt
C. G. Haenel Waffen und Fahrradfabrik KG, Suhl
Österreichische Waffenfabrik AG, Steyr



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Sunday, December 5th 2010, 8:04pm

Maschinengewehr 33

(Machinegun Model 33)

The Machinegun Model 33 was adopted in that year as the Heer standard light machinegun for use at the squad level. It was designed by Heinrich Vollmer from Mauser Werke AG, based on the recently introduced Solothurn MG30. The principal improvements were moving the feed mechanism to a more convenient location on the left of the breech and the addition of a shroud around the barrel. The Machinegun Model 33 was the first general-purpose machinegun to be introduced to widespread service use, being issued to infantry units at the squad level as well as equipping specialist machinegun units for sustained fire. A unique feature of the Machinegun Model 33 was its double-crescent trigger, which provided select fire capability without the need for a fire mode selector switch. Pressing the upper segment of the trigger produced semi-automatic fire, while holding the lower segment of the trigger produced fully-automatic fire

A derivative of the Machinegun Model 33 for use as a secondary weapon on armoured vehicles was the Machinegun Model 34. This featured a heavier barrel more suited to sustained fire and the ammunition feed was changed from 50-round drum magazines to 250-round belts. As such the Machinegun Model 34 is used as a standard secondary weapon on the Heer’s tanks, armoured cars and other armoured vehicles.



7

Monday, December 6th 2010, 2:11pm

Karabiner 37

(Semi-automatic Carbine Model 37)


The Carbine Model 37 was introduced to Heer service after a lengthy process of testing in the middle 1930s. Developed by the Swiss firm Waffenfabrik Solothurn it featured the new 7x40mm lightweight cartridge. Adoption of the Carbine Model 37 was not without opposition within the Heer and within the Reichstag, but adoption of semi-automatic weapons by several of Germany’s neighbors prompted a selection that some consider premature.

The weapon has been adopted as the Heer’s primary service rifle, and production has been continuing at a high rate. However, certain technical issues have prompted calls for its replacement by a weapon more suited to the Heer’s requirements.



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Sunday, April 1st 2012, 9:06pm

Maschinengewehr MG3

(Machinegun MG3)



9

Friday, April 27th 2012, 3:02am

Selbstlade Gewehr G5

(Self-loading Rifle G5)


10

Sunday, June 30th 2013, 11:29pm

G-11 Rifle

The Mauser designed G-11 rifle was adopted as a specialist weapon for the Marinelandungsverband and Marinesicherungsverband of the German Kriegsmarine. It was procured in limited numbers from 1944 onward.


System of operation: Gas-operated, air-cooled, selective automatic or semi-automatic fire
Calibre: 7.92 x57mm
Weight: unloaded 4.9 kg
Weight: loaded 5.5 kg
Length overall: 110 cm
Length of barrel: 48 cm
Feed device: 20-round magazine
Sights - front: Folding post sights
Sights - rear: Graduated 100-1,200 metres
Muzzle velocity: 750 m/s
Effective rate of fire: Semiautomatic 20 rpm; automatic 40-60 rpm
Effective range: 400 metres

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Saturday, May 24th 2014, 11:04pm

Pistols of the Heer

These two weapons are considered standard issue by the Heer; officers are permitted to purchase and carry sidearms of personal choice. The Pistole 08 is no longer in production; current procurement is limited to the Pistole 36, manufactured under license from Fabrique Nationale of Liege.


Pistole 08

Weight: 871 grams
Length: 222 mm
Barrel length: 95–200 mm
Cartridge: 9×19mm Parabellum
Action: Toggle-locked, short recoil
Rate of fire: Semi-automatic
Muzzle velocity: 350–400 m/s (100 mm barrel)
Effective firing range: 50 m (100 mm barrel)
Feed system: 8-round detachable box magazine
Sights: Iron sights

Pistole 36

Weight: 1 kg
Length: 197 mm
Barrel length: 119 mm
Cartridge: 9×19mm Parabellum
Action: Short recoil
Rate of fire: Semi-automatic
Muzzle velocity: 335 m/s
Effective firing range: 50 m
Feed system: Detachable box magazine, 13 rounds
Sights: Iron sights

12

Friday, November 10th 2017, 4:03pm

Maschinenkarabiner G6



Developed by the Mauser-werke in response to Heer requirements for a light automatic weapon to replace the MP36 submachinegun as well as the G5 rifle in certain units. This weapon uses the new Polte 7.92x45mm intermediate cartridge. Trials in the spring of 1948 established the superiority of the Mauser submission and low-rate production of the new G6 rifle was underway by the close of that year.

Technical Data

Weight: 4 kg (with empty magazine)
Length: 940 mm
Barrel length: 419 mm
Cartridge: 7.92x45mm
Action: Roller-delayed blowback
Rate of fire: 350–450 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity: 680 m/s
Effective firing range: 300-450 metres
Maximum firing range: 800 metres
Feed system: 30-round detachable box magazine
Sights: Rear: V-notch; front: hooded post